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Making Your Own Aromatherapeutic Remedies

Posted by Lauren at 09:21 on 5 May 2020

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  • Air diffusers
  • Chest rubs (creams or gels)
  • Creams and lotions 
  • Essential oil blends in vegetable oil carrier 
  • Gels
  • Inhalations
  • Mouth wash and gargle
  • Steam Inhalation

Quick Steps to Making Your Own Aromatherapeutic Remedies

When making your own aromatherapeutic remedies it is important to consider the ingredients you are adding to your recipe, as each one can support the therapeutic effects of the essential oils. Take time to choose your essential oils, bearing in mind the commentaries in the article above, while making sure that your formulation includes ingredients that will enhance transdermal penetration, improve skin protection, function and repair, as well as offering antimicrobial power and immune resilience and, not to forget, which add a sense of wellbeing through the overall scent. 

Below are some recipes contributed and created for you to try to help address certain issues people may be experiencing in this unprecedented time. The recipes are formulated to allow you to blend and insert the essential oils in the final phase. For information about dosage of essential oils click here

1. Nourish & Repair Hand Cream 

Increased cleansing of hands with detergents and alcohol gels causes a breakdown of the skin’s natural protection, oils and ability to repair. This leaves the hands open to dryness, cracking and chapping. This recipe is designed to provide rich nourishment, moisture, and protection to very dry, un-comfortable and sensitised skins. 

Shea butter is used for its occlusive, emollient and skin cell renewal properties, combined with Sunflower oil that is naturally rich in vitamin E, Thistle oil that is easily absorbed and rich in omega 6, Apricot oil for its soft skin feel, emollient properties and ease of absorption. The emulsifier used in this formulation also adds a natural layer of protection to the skin as well as assisting the absorption of other ingredients.

The humectant properties of glycerine are used to help bind water to the skin and prevent further dehydration, whilst Vitamin E acts as an antioxidant and assists skin repair alongside the healing and soothing properties of Calendula co2 extract.

Ingredients:

Stage I Fat Phase
1.5 % Shea butter [ Butyrospermum parkii]
10 % Sunflower Oil [Helianthus annuus]
10 % Thistle Oil [Carthamus tinctorius]
5 % Apricot Kernel oil [Prunus armeniaca]
4 % Emulsifier [O/W] [Cetearyl alcohol & Cetearyl Glucoside]

Stage II Water Phase
3% Glycerine
61.5 % Water [not from the tap]

Stage III Active/Cooling Phase 
1% Preservative [Phenoxyethanol, Ethylhexylglycerin]
1.5% Vitamin E [Tocopherol]
0.5% Calendula CO2 extract [Calendula officinalis]
1% Essential Oil 

Method:
  • Begin by weighing all the stage I ingredients into a heating vessel, a stainless steel melting pan is suitable for smaller quantities and then heat on the Bain Marie. Ensure to heat this stage I so that the temperature reaches/ is over 75°C.
     
  • Whilst the Stage I is heating measure out the glycerine into a larger beaker/ vessel and put aside.
     
  • Boil the water [Hint/ Tip - boil more water than you need].
     
  • Only when stage one has reached over 75°C measure the freshly boiled water either using a beaker on the scales or using a measuring cylinder and pour into the vessel/ beaker containing the glycerine.
     
  • Without allowing the temperature of stage I & Stage II to drop below 75°C steadily pour the stage one fats into the stage two water, whilst blitzing with the stick blender, an emulsion will form.
     
  • The cream will continue to thicken as the emulsion cools, cover and put aside to cool to 40°C.
     
  • Measure or weigh the Stage III Preservative, Vitamin E and Calendula CO2 into small beaker and blend thoroughly into the cooled cream. Once this is done measure/ weigh the recommended essential oils and mix thoroughly into the cooled cream.
     
  • Jar and label

2. Skin Soothing Facial Lotion Cream

The wearing of face masks can irritate the skin, causing pressure-like depressions in the skin. This can lead to marks and some soreness that with repeated wearing of masks may mean that the skin does not recover as quickly as normal. 

The oils that are used within this recipe are used for their naturally occurring properties. Jojoba oil is well known for its ease of absorption and sebum like quality whilst still providing an occlusive film that protects, it is also a well-tolerated oil by all skin types. The hazelnut oil and apricot oils are soft, light and very easily absorbed conditioning the skin. The humectant properties of glycerine will help to bind water to the skin whilst the Carrot Co2 extract and Vitamin E will help to heal damaged skin.

Ingredients:

Stage I - Fat Phase
2% Jojoba oil [ Simmondsia chinensis]
1% Hazelnut oil [Corylus avellana]
2% Apricot oil [Prunus armeniaca]
3.5 % Emulsifier [O/W] [Cetearyl Alcohol and Cetearyl Glucoside] 

Stage II - Water Phase
2% Glycerin 
84.5% water

Stage III - Active/ Cooling Phase
1% Preservative [Phenoxyethanol, Ethylhexylglycerin]
2% Vitamin E [Tocopherol]
1% Carrot CO2 extract [ Simmondsia chinensis, Daucus carota satvia root, Rosmarinus officinalis, Helianthus annuus]
1% Essential Oil

Method
  • Begin by weighing all the stage I ingredients into a heating vessel, a stainless steel melting pan is suitable for smaller quantities and then heat on the Bain Marie. Ensure to heat this stage I so that the temperature reaches/ is over 75°C.
     
  • Whilst the Stage I is heating measure out the glycerine into a larger beaker/ vessel and put aside.
     
  • Boil the water [Hint/ Tip - boil more water than you need].
     
  • Only when stage one has reached over 75°C measure the freshly boiled water either using a beaker on the scales or using a measuring cylinder and pour into the vessel/ beaker containing the glycerine.
     
  • Without allowing the temperature of stage I & Stage II to drop below 75°C steadily pour the stage one fats into the stage two water, whilst blitzing with the stick blender to ensure the oil and water phases mix to create an emulsion. As the emulsion forms it should resemble a thin custard.
     
  • The lotion cream will continue to thicken slightly as it cools, cover, and put aside to cool to 40°C.
     
  • Measure or weigh the Stage III Preservative, Vitamin E and Carrot Co2 extract into small beaker and blend into the cooled cream. Once they have thoroughly mixed into the lotion then measure and add the recommended essential oils.
     
  • Transfer to jar/ bottle and label.

3. Simple Gel 

This is a simple aloe vera gel recipe that is versatile in its application, it is designed to be light and easily absorbed without leaving a very sticky residue. The organic apricot oil is used provide moisture, soften, and condition the skin as well as assist the quick absorption of the soothing aloe vera and the essential oils chosen. 

Ingredients:

Stage I
1% Xanthan Gum
85% Water

Stage II
10% Aloe vera concentrate
2% Apricot Kernel oil (Prunus armeniaca)

Stage III: Active/Cooling Phase 
1% Preservative [Phenoxyethanol, Ethylhexylglycerin]
1% Essential Oil 

Method
  • Begin by weighing all the room temperature water into a large vessel, beaker or bowl depending on the quantity you are making.
     
  • Weigh the xanthan gum powder separately and then sprinkle over the surface of the water.
     
  • Whisk or blend the gum and water together, a gel will begin to form. 
    (Hint/Tip use an electric hand blender for larger volumes and make sure you do not introduce air into the mixture)
     
  • Set the stage I gel aside.
     
  • In a separate beaker weigh the stage II ingredients and pour into the Stage I mixture and mix by blitzing with a hand blender or whisk.
     
  • Weigh the stage III preservative ingredient into a small beaker and pour into the gel and mix using a hand blender or whisk.
     
  • Weigh or use the appropriate number of drops of the recommended essential oils and mix thoroughly into the gel.

4. Essential Oil Room Spray 

In this room spray recipe, to help to cleanse the air when the use of an aromatherapy diffuser or steamer is not suitable. In this formula/ recipe polysorbate 20 is used to solubilise the essential oils so that they disperse fully through the suspension and do not to separate.

Ingredients:

Stage I
3% Polysorbate 20
3% Essential oils

Stage II
1% Preservative (Phenoxyethanol Ethylhexylglycerin)
50% Water 
43% Organic Hydrolat (suggestions to choose from; Tea tree, Peppermint, Orange)

Method
  • In a glass beaker weigh the stage I polysorbate 20.
     
  • In a separate small beaker weigh or measure the drops of your Stage I recommended essential oils or essential oil blend.
     
  • Pour and stir the essential oils into the Polysorbate 20, stirring continuously until fully mixed.
     
  • In a separate larger beaker weigh the Stage II water and hydrolat. (Tip/ Hint choose a hydrolat that compliments your chosen essential oils).
     
  • Slowly mix the Stage I into Stage II stirring continuously. When fully mixed decant into a spray bottle and label.

5. Aromatherapeutic Bath Bloom

This recipe is designed to be used as a bath bloom softening and conditioning the skin whilst safely solubilising the essential oils through the water. This prevents possible irritation that can occur when essential oils pool together on the surface of bathing waters. As a suggestion I would recommend using essential oils that are robust in aroma especially for the olfaction element of an aromatherapy bath treatment because Red Turkey Bath Oil does have an aroma itself that may need covering-up.

Ingredients:

Stage I
2% Peach Kernel oil (Prunus vulgaris)
3% Sunflower oil (Helianthus annuus)
2% Essential oil

Stage II
93% Red Turkey Oil (Sulfated castor oil)

Method
  • In a glass beaker weigh the Peach kernel oil and sunflower oil and stir together to mix.
     
  • Mix the preblended and pre-measured (either by drops or weight) Essential oils into the Peach and Sunflower oil blend.
     
  •  In a large glass beaker weigh the Stage II Red Turkey Oil.
     
  • Slowly pour Stage I into Stage II and stir thoroughly decant into bottles and label. 

By Deana Kassim, IFA member
www.purodem.com

Please note this article is subject to copyright, permission must be obtained from the IFA before use and appropriately referenced.

For more information:

If you would like to learn more about essential oils please view our course listings and contact an IFA approved course provider. Caution must be exercised when using essential oils and where there is doubt, always contact an IFA registered Aromatherapist who will offer guidance on the oils that are suitable for individual needs. Our Register is approved by the Professional Standards Authority (PSA), a UK body accountable to Parliament.